Online Predator Prevention Tips by Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

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50 Online Predator Prevention Tips

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Online Predator Prevention: Having been a practicing psychologist and forensic examiner before changing his career path to the study and investigation of online users who engage in malevolent and nefarious activities, Dr. Nuccitelli fully understands that most sexual predators are typically close in age to the child victim and usually family members, friends or intimate partners of their victims. Although this reality has been validated by prestigious researchers, the FBI in May 2011 published a three minute video estimating that any given time there are 750,000 online child predators trolling cyberspace for children.

Dr. Nuccitelli recently stated, “I don’t think society at large truly understands the widespread growth of child pornography and online sexual predators in cyberspace trolling for child targets. Whether you support them or not, in 2012 I read an article reporting that the group Anonymous, had announced their campaign to confront and thwart online sexual predators. As someone who is attempting to do the same thing, I applaud their endeavor.”

Simply stated, Online Predators are sexual predators who use Information and Communications Technology and the Internet to locate, target and victimize minors. Common forums used by Online Predators to target children include chat rooms, instant messaging or social networking sites for the purpose of flirting with and meeting others for illicit sexual experiences. Online Predators often are motivated to manipulate or “groom” a minor with the ultimate goal of meeting and engaging in sexual activity, despite knowing they are engaging in illegal activities.

In instances where meeting their victims to engage in sexual activities is not the primary objective, Online Predators also attempt to persuade children and teens to participate in some form of online sexual and/or sexually provocative activity motivated by sexual deviance or for financial gain engaging in the distribution and sale of child pornography.

As Information and Communications Technology (ICT) becomes widespread, cyber attack prevention, education and protection are areas requiring immediate attention. The Information Age has many benefits to humanity, but it is vital to identify and prevent the malevolent and nefarious elements that exist in cyberspace and Information and Communications Technology.

The typologies of iPredator include: Cyber Bullying, Cyber Harassment, Cyber Stalking, Cyber Crime, Online Sexual Predation and Cyber Terrorism. Within this construct, Cyber Harassment is the adult form of Cyber Bullying and used when the perpetrator is an adult. The definition and motivations of iPredator, Online Sexual Predation and Cyberstealth is as follows:

iPredator: A child, adult, group or nation who, directly or indirectly, engages in exploitation, victimization, stalking, theft or disparagement of others using Information and Communications Technology. iPredators are driven by deviant fantasies, desires for power and control, retribution, religious fanaticism, political reprisal, psychiatric illness, perceptual distortions, peer acceptance or personal and financial gain. iPredators can be any age, either gender and not bound by economic status, race or national heritage.

iPredator is a global term used to distinguish all online users who engage in criminal, deviant or abusive behaviors using ICT. Whether the offender is a cyber bully, cyber stalker, cyber criminal, online sexual predator, Internet troll or cyber terrorist, they fall within the scope of iPredator. There are three criteria used to define an iPredator including:

I. A self-awareness of causing harm to others, directly or indirectly, using ICT. II. The intermittent to frequent usage of ICT to obtain, exchange and deliver harmful information. III. A general understanding of Cyberstealth to engage in criminal or deviant acts or to profile, identify, locate, stalk and engage a target.

When an offender profile includes these three characteristics, they meet the definition of iPredator. A fourth criterion, not included in the triad defining an iPredator, is what I have termed iPredator Victim Intuition (IVI) and reserved for seasoned iPredators. IVI is the aptitude to sense a target’s online vulnerabilities, weaknesses and technological limitations increasing their success with minimal ramifications. iPredators, through practice and learning, develop a sense and/or skill of being able to experience an intuition to know what online user will be a successful target.

In addition to having IVI, the iPredator practices Cyberstealth using multiple covert strategies. In fact, the third criteria used to define an iPredator include a general understanding of Cyberstealth used to profile, identify, locate, stalk and engage a target. Also lying upon a continuum of expertise, iPredators are assessed as being advanced in their Cyberstealth practices as opposed to a haphazard approach of targeting a victim without attempting to hide their identity.

Often times, cyber bullies, ex-partners, ex-employees, angry or self-righteous online users, Internet trolls, organized groups with political, religious and moralistic causes, child molesters, pedophiles and highly narcissistic online users do not attempt to hide their identities. Cyberstealth is a strategy reserved for iPredators who seek to hide their identities online.

Cyberstealth, a concept formulated along with iPredator, is a term used to define a method and/or strategies by which iPredators devise tactics to establish and sustain complete anonymity while they troll and stalk an online target. In addition to a stratagem, Cyberstealth is a reality of Information and Communications Technology, that humanity often fails to fathom leading some online users to become high probability targets. Cyberstealth is a learned behavior that becomes more advanced with practice, trial and error and experimentation.

Here are 50 topics relevant to understanding the profiles of online child predators. Based on your child’s age and developmentally maturity, these 50 points can also be used as independent discussions. Whether you are a parent or educator, these topics are vital in your endeavor to educate a child on cyber security.

Online Predator Prevention Tips-Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

50 ONLINE PREDATOR PREVENTION TIPS

  • 1. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows Internet sex crimes involving adults and children more often fit a model of statutory rape.
  • 2. An adult or primary caregiver uses developmentally appropriate prevention strategies to educate the child on romance and sex.
  • 3. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows how to recognize if the child has sexual orientation concerns or patterns of offline and online risk taking.
  • 4. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the characteristics of Internet-initiated sex crimes.
  • 5. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the stereotype of the iPredator using trickery and violence to assault children is largely inaccurate.
  • 6. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most Internet sex crimes involve young adult men who seduce underage adolescents into sexual encounters.
  • 7. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the majority of Internet sex crimes involve victims aware they are conversing online with adults.
  • 8. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows iPredators rarely deceive their victims about their sexual interests.
  • 9. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most children who meet an iPredator face to face go to such meetings expecting to engage in sexual activity.
  • 10. The child is aware iPredators primarily deceive children using promises of love and romance, but their intentions are primarily sexual.
  • 11. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most iPredators are charged with statutory rape involving non-forcible sexual activity with their victims.
  • 12. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows age-of-consent law violations are the most common sex crimes against minors in general.
  • 13. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the majority of sex crimes against children are never reported to law enforcement.
  • 14. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows that Internet sex crimes pursued most by law enforcement involves adult offenders who are 10 or more years older than their underage victims.
  • 15. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows they are experiencing or soon to experience adolescent sexual development with growing sexual curiosity.
  • 16. An adult or primary caregiver knows most early adolescent children are already aware of, thinking about and beginning to experiment with sex.
  • 17. An adult or primary caregiver is aware of mid-adolescence, most children have had romantic partners and absorbed by romantic concerns.
  • 18. The child is or will be educated on how Internet initiated sex crimes often involve greater self-disclosure and intensity than face-to-face relationships among peers.
  • 19. Relevant to a child’s online activity, an adult or primary caregiver is aware children often struggle with emotional control during their early to mid-teens.
  • 20. An adult or primary caregiver is aware the child and all children are vulnerable to seduction by iPredators due to immaturity, inexperience and the impulsiveness of exploring normal sexual urges.
  • 21. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows children who send personal information to online strangers are more likely to receive aggressive sexual solicitations.
  • 22. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows iPredators groom children by establishing trust and confidence first.
  • 23. The child knows to never disclose their personal information at anonymous video chat sites even if together with close friends.
  • 24. The child is aware chat rooms are one of the prime arenas iPredators seek out child victims.
  • 25. The child is aware many chat rooms engage in explicit sexual talk, sexual innuendo and profanity.
  • 26. The child is aware many chat rooms that engage in explicit sexual talk are frequented by iPredators.
  • 27. An adult or primary caregiver is aware evidence suggesting children and teens who regularly visit chat rooms are more likely to have problems with sadness, loneliness or depression.
  • 28. An adult or primary caregiver is aware clinical evidence suggests children and teens who regularly visit chat rooms have more problems with their parents and engage in risky behavior.
  • 29. An adult or primary caregiver is aware clinical evidence suggests children lacking in social skills interact with others in chat rooms to compensate for the obstacles they have forming offline relationships.
  • 30. An adult or primary caregiver is aware clinical evidence suggests younger teens are not developmentally prepared to avoid or respond to the explicit sexual invitations they are likely to encounter in many chat rooms.
  • 31. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most iPredators meet their child victims in chat rooms.
  • 32. An adult or primary caregiver is aware children and teens with histories of sexual, physical and emotional abuse are more vulnerable to iPredator grooming.
  • 33. An adult or primary caregiver knows a child and teen online users with histories of offline sexual or physical abuse are far more likely to receive online aggressive sexual solicitations.
  • 34. An adult or primary caregiver knows emotionally abused children and teens are more at risk for online sexual victimization and exploitation.
  • 35. An adult or primary caregiver knows research suggests some children and teens are more vulnerable to online sexual solicitations because they are looking for attention and affection.
  • 36. An adult or primary caregiver knows childhood trauma is associated with adolescent risk behavior, risky sexual behavior and online risk behavior.
  • 37. An adult or primary caregiver knows prior childhood abuse may trigger risky offline and online sexual behavior that directly invites iPredator advances.
  • 38. An adult or primary caregiver knows social interaction problems and depression has been suggested to increase a child’s vulnerability to iPredator sexual abuse.
  • 39. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the only online activity more risky than posting online personal information for children and teens is conversing online with strangers about sex.
  • 40. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows iPredators have not changed their tactics of stalking children online because of the advent of social networking sites (i.e. Facebook, MySpace).
  • 41. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows iPredators often stalk and abduct teens based on information they have posted on their social networking profiles (i.e. Facebook, MySpace).
  • 42. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows iPredators rarely stalk and abduct teens at social networking profiles (i.e. Facebook, MySpace), unless they conclude the child is susceptible to their grooming and seduction tactics.
  • 43. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows children and teens who have blogs and post personal information for public display are at a higher risk of being targeted by an iPredator.
  • 44. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows children and teens are more likely to receive online sexual solicitations via instant messages or in chat rooms than through social networking sites (i.e. Facebook, MySpace).
  • 45. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows children and teens’ level of vulnerability to online sexual solicitation is influenced more by online interactions with online strangers rather than images and information they post on social networking sites (i.e. Facebook, MySpace).
  • 46. An adult or primary caregiver knows children who interact with online strangers and engage in other risky online behaviors are significantly more likely to receive aggressive sexual solicitations.
  • 47. An adult or primary caregiver knows teen females constitute a higher proportion of iPredator victims than teen males, but teen males who identify as gay or questioning their sexual orientations are at a much higher rate of online victimization.
  • 48. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the fundamental differences between a Pedophile and Child Molester.
  • 49. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows sexual solicitations are defined as requests to engage in sexual activities or sexual talk, or to give personal sexual information.
  • 50. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows posting images, videos or other personal information on social networking sites is dangerous.

Online Predator Prevention Tips-Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Online Predator Prevention Tips-Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

dr.-internet-safety-michael-nuccitelli-ipredator-symbol

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. is a NYS licensed psychologist and cyber criminology consultant. He completed his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Adler University in 1994. In 2010, Dr. Nuccitelli authored the dark side of cyberspace concept known as “iPredator.” In November 2011, he established iPredator Inc., offering educational, investigative, and advisory services involving criminal psychology, cyberstalking, cyberbullying, online predators, internet trolls, the dark side of cyberspace and internet safety. Dr. Nuccitelli has worked in the mental health field over the last thirty-plus years and has volunteered his time helping cyber-attacked victims since 2010. His goal is to reduce victimization, theft, and disparagement from iPredators.

In addition to aiding citizens & disseminating educational content, Dr. Nuccitelli’s mission is to initiate a sustained national educational and awareness internet safety campaign with the help of private, state, and federal agencies. He is always available, at no cost, to interact with online users, professionals, and the media. To invite Dr. Nuccitelli to conduct training, media engagements, educational services, or consultation, please call him at (347) 871-2416 or via email at drnucc@ipredatorinc.com.

dr.-internet-safety-home-button

Founded by Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D., iPredator Inc. is a NYC Internet Safety Company founded to offer educational and advisory products and services to online users and organizations on cyberbullying, cyberstalking, cybercrime, internet defamation and online sexual predation. iPredator Inc.’s goal is to reduce victimization, theft, and disparagement from online perpetrators.
New York City, New York
US
Phone: 347-871-2416

Information Age St. Valentines by Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Information Age St. Valentine’s

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Information Age St. Valentines Day-Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

A St. Valentine’s Day Arousal Strategy for Men

The Information Age is a societal paradigm and period beginning in the last quarter of the 20th century and presently thriving in the second decade of the 21st century. The Information Age represents the evolution, emergence, consumption of and reliance upon Information and Communications Technology (ICT). In a mere four decades, ICT and its importance to humanity have led many to surmise that the planet and its human inhabitants are amidst an Information Revolution.

Mobile device technology, telecommunications, social media & cyberspace are just a few examples of humanities newest frontiers. In all of these arenas, they deal with the new intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics of how humankind obtains exchanges and disseminates information. As humanity is at the beginning of the Information Age and with no manner to forecast its longevity or impact, historians will one day look back upon our generation and define the 21st century as when Information and Communications Technology (ICT) had its origin.

Given it is 2013 and anyone who reads this article is alive and thriving in the Information Age, it is natural to use the old tricks of chocolate, flowers or stuffed animals to express your love for her and show gratitude she is in your life. Instead of or in addition to the expected St. Valentine’s Day gifts you gave her last year, how about doing something Information Age creative? The strategy is easy, inexpensive and increases your odds of ending the night in bed and being bragged about to her friends and family? Remember this symbolic equation for all holidays.

Knowledge + Humility + Effort = Major Aphrodisiac!

Women are aroused by men knowledgeable about meaningful topics and can communicate them in a humble manner. Increasing knowledge and creative planning are easy using these systematic instructions. St. Valentine’s Day is a perfect time to practice the art of Information Age seduction. Below are 10 topics involving St. Valentine’s Day history, which will arouse her curiosity, intrigue her senses, and elevate her desire. Once you have mastered this strategy for Valentine’s, you can also apply the method for every holiday and special occasion. The strategy works 110% of the time and targets a women’s proverbial “Achilles Heel” of psychologically melting when she perceives her partner invested effort into making her happy.

Sensual seduction and female arousal involves 80% communication and 20% physical. The 10 facts below are common tidbits of information anyone can find online. Although basic facts on St. Valentine’s Day, they present a valuable weapon in the art of seduction. Thoroughly memorizing them followed by using creative applications is seduction personified.

The first step is learning the 10 facts well enough to repeat them to a friend or colleague. It is not necessary to know all 10 word for word, but the general theme. A technique to imprint the list to memory is using the bolding feature on your computer. Bold proper names, dates, and general themes of each factoid will take 20-30 minutes. After bolding all 10, commit them to memory through repetition.

Once memorized, the next and most crucial step is creative application. Creative application is brainstorming ways to communicate them in an innovative way. In addition to communicating these details, creative application ventures into non-direct methods. A simple technique can be written in the Valentine’s Day card. Most men rely on the message printed in the card followed by his terms of endearment and signature.

Instead, buy a blank card and write a message using one of the 10 Valentine’s facts listed below. For example, take fact #4, briefly write why the letter “X” became representative of a kiss, and then finish using #10 on why Doves represent love. The combinations alone are infinite. Another tip is the email message. For example, put #2 in the subject line with italics saying “Feast of Lupercalia.” In the body of the email, briefly describe the feast and how St. Valentine’s Day spent together will feel like the “Feast of Lupercalia.”

Have a little creative juice pulsing through your veins? Upload an image you download online, like in Google image search, upload the image to any free online image editor (www.iPiccy.com), add your factoid and terms of endearment and then share it on her Facebook profile and include the image in an email attachment. The image pasted here took this writer 10 minutes to create using a free online image editor.

As stated, these 10 facts become part of your arsenal for seduction and your trail to victory is guaranteed. If you are single and out on the town looking to meet women, the creative step is minimal. In the single man meeting a single woman strategy, the goal is subtly discussing St. Valentine’s Day using memorized factoids. Emphasis is on being subtle and not being verbose. Once she expresses interest in St. Valentine’s Day, introducing other tidbits are acceptable. The goal is a humble manner devoid of being pompous or egotistical.

If married or actively dating, creative application becomes paramount. Using creative application is dictated by the time involved with a woman. If married or a couple for more than one year, creative application requires more planning. More strategic planning is due to her knowing your intellect, areas of interest, and hidden agendas. If past Valentine’s Day exchanges were dull, creative applications may be received with suspicion. Whether past Valentine’s Day activities have been dull or contrived, this strategy will most certainly heat things up and cause her to re-define how she defines the man who walks with her through life. The 10 Valentine’s Day facts are as follows.

I. Valentine’s Day dates back to the Roman Empire during the reign of Claudius. As legend has it; Emperor Claudius forbade men to marry believing bachelors functioned better as soldiers during wartime. Objecting to the Emperor’s statute, Bishop Valentine continued to perform secret marital ceremonies. Deemed subversive, Valentine was incarcerated with execution as punishment. Young people flocked to visit him. One young woman was the daughter of the prison guard. On the day of his execution, Valentine scribed a note to her signing it “Love from your Valentine.” This was on February 14, 269 A. D.

II. The Romans celebrated the Feast of Lupercalia. Lupercalia was a pastoral festival celebrated from February 13th through the 15th. The theme was to purify the city by expelling evil spirits releasing fertility and health. Lupercalia replaced Februa, an even older spring cleansing ritual held on the same date. This ancient ritual word, Februa, continues to thrive giving the month of February its name.

III. February 14th may be the celebrated day of St. Valentine’s, but during ancient Rome the 14th of February was celebrated to honor Juno. She was a Roman goddess, equivalent to Hera, the Greek queen of the gods. Juno was a majestic figure wearing a diadem on her head. The peacock was her symbolic animal. Juno was also the guardian spirit of women and marriage.

IV. The letter X is the symbol used in XO when signing a letter, card, or online message meaning a “kiss” is attached. X became the symbol of the kiss during medieval times. The vast majority of citizens could not read or write. Having few skills in penmanship, contractual agreements were signed writing the letter X. The person was witnessed writing the X and then kissed the X confirming validation.

V. During the middle ages, a custom each year was for young men and women to pick a name from a bowl predicting who would be their Valentine. Once their lucky Valentine was chosen, they would wear his/her name pinned to their sleeves for an entire week. From this custom comes the expression “to wear your heart on your sleeve.”

VI. Chocolate has historical significance symbolizing love, passion, and a gift for Valentine’s Day. Casanova, known as symbolizing the worlds “greatest lover,” ate chocolate believing it heightened his sexual prowess. As recent as the 19th century, doctors prescribed chocolate for their patients experiencing negative symptoms caused by a lost love. Also during the latter part of the 19th century, the Cadbury Company produced and marketed boxes of chocolate for loved ones on Valentine’s Day.

VII. Flowers remain the gift of choice on Valentine’s Day. Roses are most popular and red roses continue to be their color of choice. The color red and the red rose have symbolized love and romance dating back to ancient times. In Greek and Roman mythology, the red rose was associated with the Goddess of Love. Aphrodite symbolized love for the Greeks and the Romans had Venus.

VIII. Cupid is one of the most famous symbols of Valentine’s Day. Like many cultural symbols, Cupid represents love and romance. Cupid was the son of Venus, Goddess of Love in ancient Roman mythology. In Greek mythology, Cupid was named Eros and the son of Aphrodite. In both Roman and Greek mythology, Cupid was depicted as a child and not a portly baby with wings. Latin mythology introduced Cupid being chubby, naked, and adorning wings. His bow with quiver of arrows was not to kill, but induce love.

IX. The symbol of a heart is associated with Valentine’s Day. The custom of drawing a heart shape originated from early attempts to draw a human organ that few witnessed. Ancient cultures believed the soul lived in the heart. The theory of how the heart became a symbol of love is attributed to the Romans and Greeks. Greeks believed Eros and Cupid for the Romans were commissioned by their mothers to shoot unsuspecting victims with their arrows causing the person to fall hopelessly in love.

X. Birds are symbols of Valentine’s Day and two particular species represent symbols of love. Lovebirds and Doves are the two. Lovebirds found in Africa, are brilliantly colored and huddle close together with their mates. Doves are symbols of loyalty because they mate for life. Also endeared by humans are doves parenting dynamics. Doves mate for life and share in the responsibilities of caring for their fledglings.

How to arouse and seduce women on Valentine’s Day is an easy exercise to learn, devise, and implement. Women enjoy men they deem interesting and spark their intrigue. The technique of arousing her mind does not require a doctoral degree, but the effort involved is what will arouse. Arousing and seducing women using intellectual prowess are not just for Valentine’s Day. This technique can be used for every holiday and as a general approach for all occasions. The art of seducing a woman starts at the top, her mind, and then slowly working to other areas.

HAVE A HAPPY & ROMANTIC VALENTINE’S DAY 2013!

FREE D/L HERE @ DOC NUCCITELLI’S GOOGLE DRIVE W/ NO PERSONAL INFORMATION REQUIRED

Information Age Valentine’s Day Seduction Tips for Men Google Drive Link:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bxo_8gJ9mSkxTmRUT3FWVG4xdFE/edit?usp=sharing

dr.-internet-safety-michael-nuccitelli-ipredator-symbol

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. is a NYS licensed psychologist and cyber criminology consultant. He completed his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Adler University in 1994. In 2010, Dr. Nuccitelli authored the dark side of cyberspace concept known as “iPredator.” In November 2011, he established iPredator Inc., offering educational, investigative, and advisory services involving criminal psychology, cyberstalking, cyberbullying, online predators, internet trolls, the dark side of cyberspace and internet safety. Dr. Nuccitelli has worked in the mental health field over the last thirty-plus years and has volunteered his time helping cyber-attacked victims since 2010. His goal is to reduce victimization, theft, and disparagement from iPredators.

In addition to aiding citizens & disseminating educational content, Dr. Nuccitelli’s mission is to initiate a sustained national educational and awareness internet safety campaign with the help of private, state, and federal agencies. He is always available, at no cost, to interact with online users, professionals, and the media. To invite Dr. Nuccitelli to conduct training, media engagements, educational services, or consultation, please call him at (347) 871-2416 or via email at drnucc@ipredatorinc.com.

dr.-internet-safety-home-button

Founded by Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D., iPredator Inc. is a NYC Internet Safety Company founded to offer educational and advisory products and services to online users and organizations on cyberbullying, cyberstalking, cybercrime, internet defamation and online sexual predation. iPredator Inc.’s goal is to reduce victimization, theft, and disparagement from online perpetrators.
New York City, New York
US
Phone: 347-871-2416

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